My Upgrade to Glamping – The Sibley 300 Deluxe

For the past few years I have been wanting to upgrade to the ultimate symbol of Glamping – the canvas tent!  I love the way they look; tan like the sand, old-timey, generous proportions, something out of the past.  Are they practical?  Yes and no, I think.  They are much more heavy to carry around (45 LBS) making them an option only for car camping.  They might not be as waterproof as the materials of today, although the manufactures say that when they get wet they swell and become imperious to rain.  But, is an antique car practical?  After looking at the various manufacturers, I selected the Sibley 300 Deluxe, manufactured and sold by CanvasCamp, in Belgium.  I ended up ordering from the European site, even though they have a U.S. distributor.  With the exchange rate, it turned out to be to my advantage, although, be careful and check whether your credit card charges you a foreign transaction fee before you make the purchase, as my card does not.

Although the tent had about half the earth to travel around, it only took about four days to get to me and it was fantastic watching its progress on the shipper’s website!

Three bag is all it takes.

Three bag is all it takes.

 

The tent comes in three parts – The tent itself in a nice canvas caring bad, a bag with the set of three breakdown poles and top fixture and the door V shipped poles. Lastly is the smallest bag with the stakes, guy ropes and repair kit.

Disassembled poles.

Disassembled poles.

 

Here are the poles prior to reassembly and note the piece with the plastic guard to protect the tent ceiling.

Bag o Stakes.

Bag o Stakes.

 

The stakes and ropes need to be attached to the tent and manufacturer says to leave the ropes attached after the first assembly of the tent to make the subsequent putting up easier.

The included instructions.

The included instructions.

 

The tent comes with a diagram, photos and instructions.  The translation into english was a little wobbly so take your time on the first try.  I decided to try raising the tent in my garage the first time so I was in a control environment.  I’m so glad I did because it took awhile to figure the instructions out!  You start by laying the tent out and if outdoors, by staking around the edges to hold it in place.  Next the three legged poles are put inside and assembled to the top piece as you raise the roof.  It is a bit tight until you get it adjusted all the way around.

Here is the top of the ceiling showing where the three poles come together.

Here is the top of the ceiling showing where the three poles come together.

 

The three legs eliminate any center pole and makes the interior space down right cavernous.

One of the three main legs.

One of the three main legs.

 

Each leg of the three poles has a rubber foot and the pole ties to the tent.

One leg of the entrance V bar showing it fitting into a slot.

One leg of the entrance V bar showing it fitting into a slot.

 

The front door uses a V shipped pole that has a locator pin at the top that fits into a grommet in the canvas tent.  It is also tied in place.

 

The tent comes with three window, each with netting to keep the bugs out.

The tent comes with three window, each with netting to keep the bugs out.

 

There are three windows, with screens, spaced around the sides.

Ready to take it outside!

Ready to take it outside!

 

At each corner is a guy rope with attached rope tensioners.  Note the vent visible at the top of the tent.

The main entrance.

The main entrance.

 

Here the tent is pretty much raised minus all the guy ropes and the rope above the entrance (too much work to put a stake in my cement garage floor!) .  The tent is high quality construction with lots of straps and a strong zipper at the door to close it up tight.

 

Next comes the field test where the whole kit – tent, air mattress, table and various other bits come together.  Stay tuned!

BellTentatPond

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